Holy Friday vigil and Lamentations.

Holy Friday vigil and Lamentations.

Sexy fire Friday

"Shapes in the Wax" a look at the Ukrainian folk healers known as the babky (singular babka) by Sarah D. Phillips of the University of Indiana. An article on the subject (also by Phillips) can be found here

yuri-rimsky:

Icons of the Emtombment

Examples of the Epitaphios for Good Friday and Holy Saturday. 

Good Friday Lamentations, stasis 1, 2 , and 3. 

One of my favorite services in the Orthodox Church. So moving, and these hymns contain layers and layers of beautiful symbols and images. Text of the hymns can be found here

simplyorthodox:

Blessed Holy Friday!

simplyorthodox:

Blessed Holy Friday!

(Source: immerlein, via graveyarddirt)

maronitesoul:

Holy Thursday And Rite of Washing of Feet
The Book of Rituals (Rome, 1839) retains two traditions of the Maronite Church. The oldest one required the washing of the feet of the whole congregation present at the service. The more recent tradition limited the washing to twelve persons representing the Twelve Apostles.
The rite of washing of feet was originally accompanied by a group of hymns with their prayers and a soogitho ( a Hymn ordered according to the letters of the alphabet). The first prayer the soogitho are used in the present service as the beginning of the rite. During the soogitho the twelve person chosen to have their feet washed come forward and take their places at the chairs prepared for them.
The altar is covered in white. A side altar or table is prepared to receive the consecrated eucharist for the Anaphora of Signing of the Chalice. This altar (or table) is covered in white and is decorated with flowers and candles. These decorations should be kept simple.
A cross with the body of Christ on it is prepared in front of the main altar. Lighted candles are placed on each side of the cross.
A pitcher of water, a basin, and towels are placed on a table in the sanctuary.
Twelve chairs are placed in the sanctuary for those whose feet will be washed. Six chairs are arranged on each side of the sanctuary, facing each other. A thirteenth chair is provided for the celebrant. It is placed in the center at the end of the two rows of chairs closest to the congregation and faces the altar and cross.
A priest (or deacon) who is able to sing well is assigned to sing the gospel. The singing of the gospel coincides with the celebrant’s action of washing the feet.
Twelve members of the community (priests, ministers, and lay people) are assigned to represent the apostles. They may be vested in alas or may wear their ordinary clothes.
The washing of feet is done in four stages, three people each time. The washing begins with the three people on the right side of the celebrant, then the three on the left, then the last three on the right, and finally the last three on the left. The last person on the left side represents Simon Peter.
The deacon sings the appropriate text of the gospel (John 13:3-5) as the feet of each group of three are washed, then the choir sings one more verse of the Hymn when the celebrant is seated.
The dialogue between Jesus and Simon Peter (John 13:6-11) concludes the singing of the gospel of John (13:12-20), followed by the closing prayer of the rite.

maronitesoul:

Holy Thursday And Rite of Washing of Feet

The Book of Rituals (Rome, 1839) retains two traditions of the Maronite Church. The oldest one required the washing of the feet of the whole congregation present at the service. The more recent tradition limited the washing to twelve persons representing the Twelve Apostles.

The rite of washing of feet was originally accompanied by a group of hymns with their prayers and a soogitho ( a Hymn ordered according to the letters of the alphabet). The first prayer the soogitho are used in the present service as the beginning of the rite. During the soogitho the twelve person chosen to have their feet washed come forward and take their places at the chairs prepared for them.

The altar is covered in white. A side altar or table is prepared to receive the consecrated eucharist for the Anaphora of Signing of the Chalice. This altar (or table) is covered in white and is decorated with flowers and candles. These decorations should be kept simple.

A cross with the body of Christ on it is prepared in front of the main altar. Lighted candles are placed on each side of the cross.

A pitcher of water, a basin, and towels are placed on a table in the sanctuary.

Twelve chairs are placed in the sanctuary for those whose feet will be washed. Six chairs are arranged on each side of the sanctuary, facing each other. A thirteenth chair is provided for the celebrant. It is placed in the center at the end of the two rows of chairs closest to the congregation and faces the altar and cross.

A priest (or deacon) who is able to sing well is assigned to sing the gospel. The singing of the gospel coincides with the celebrant’s action of washing the feet.

Twelve members of the community (priests, ministers, and lay people) are assigned to represent the apostles. They may be vested in alas or may wear their ordinary clothes.

The washing of feet is done in four stages, three people each time. The washing begins with the three people on the right side of the celebrant, then the three on the left, then the last three on the right, and finally the last three on the left. The last person on the left side represents Simon Peter.

The deacon sings the appropriate text of the gospel (John 13:3-5) as the feet of each group of three are washed, then the choir sings one more verse of the Hymn when the celebrant is seated.

The dialogue between Jesus and Simon Peter (John 13:6-11) concludes the singing of the gospel of John (13:12-20), followed by the closing prayer of the rite.

(via graveyarddirt)

simplyorthodox:

Great and Holy Thursday

On Thursday of Holy Week four events are commemorated:

- the washing of the disciples’ feet

- the institution of the Sacrament of the Holy Eucharist at the Last Supper

- the agony in the garden of Gethsemane

- the betrayal of Christ by Judas.

The Institution of the Eucharist

At the Mystical Supper in the Upper Room Jesus gave a radically new meaning to the food and drink of the sacred meal. He identified Himself with the bread and wine: “Take, eat; this is my Body. Drink of it all of you; for this is my Blood of the New Covenant” (Matthew 26:26-28).

The Washing of the Feet

The events initiated by Jesus at the Mystical.Supper were profoundly significant. By teaching and giving the disciples His final instructions and praying for them as well, He revealed again His divine Sonship and authority. By establishing the Eucharist, He enshrines to perfection God’s most intimate purposes for our salvation, offering Himself as Communion and life. By washing the feet of His disciples, He summarized the meaning of His ministry, manifested His perfect love and revealed His profound humility. The act of the washing of the feet (John 13:2-17) is closely related to the sacrifice of the Cross. Both reveal aspects of Christ’s kenosis. While the Cross constitues the ultimate manifestation of Christ’s perfect obedience to His Father (Philippians 2:5-8), the washing of the feet signifies His intense love and the giving of Himself to each person according to that person’s ability to receive Him (John 13:6-9).

Prayer in the Garden

The Synoptic Gospels have preserved for us another significant episode in the series of events leading to the Passion, namely, the agony and prayer of Jesus in the Garden of Gethsemane (Matthew 26:36-46; Mark 14:32-42; Luke 22:39-46).

The Betrayal

Judas betrayed Christ with a kiss, the sign of friendship and love. The betrayal and crucifixion of Christ carried the ancestral sin to its extreme limits. In these two acts the rebellion against God reached its maximum capacity. The seduction of man in paradise culminated in the death of God in the flesh. To be victorious evil must quench the light and discredit the good. In the end, however, it shows itself to be a lie, an absurdity and sheer madness. The death and resurrection of Christ rendered evil powerless.

On Great Thursday light and darkness, joy and sorrow are so strangely mixed. At the Upper Room and in Gethsemane the light of the kingdom and the darkness of hell come through simultaneously. The way of life and the way of death converge. We meet them both in our journey through life.

(via graveyarddirt)

allaboutmary:

A colonial painting from Chile of Our Lady of Solitude.

allaboutmary:

A colonial painting from Chile of Our Lady of Solitude.

(Source: memoriachilena.cl)